Some meetings have participants who dominate discussion. They speak first or forcefully and “hijack” the direction of subsequent contributions. Other participants may remain silent or focus on their reactions to the first individual. The breadth of possible comments may be lost. Possible new insights and creativity are lost. Fortunately, you can choose a structure for your…

Effective discussions can build commitment to decisions, but many meetings fail to do this. One reason for this can be participant assumptions about the nature of the decision. For example, participants may assume they are providing input to the leader’s decision. Meanwhile, the leader assumes s/he is gaining their commitment to the decision. You may…

An article titled “Meeting Up” in this week’s Economist (April 4th) provides a good summary of research on challenges of reaching decisions with a group. As you know from earlier posts, I agree that how we conduct our meetings has huge consequences for their results. The recommendations for improving things presented here have an important…

You can structure your meetings to create more insightful decisions by including different participants and perspectives…but only if those perspectives are not overcome by a tendency to conform to the majority view. Poor group decisions can be due to the initial predisposition of the group. That predisposition will shape the points of any discussion. Sunstein…

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